Whatever happened to spiritual health?

I begin by worshipping the gods, and try to conduct myself in such a way that in answer to my prayers I may have health and physical strength, esteem in the city, the affection of my friends, safety with honour in war, and wealth increased by honest means – Ischomachus, in the Oikonomikos, 11.8

In the modern western world, when we are faced with health problems that we can’t explain, we simply say it is undiagnosed. If it relates to emotions, or we cannot observe any physical symptoms, we call it mental illness.

However, in the ancient and medieval world, there was a spiritual dimension to health. In many parts of the world, there still is. Yoga, for instance, is not just about stretching, but for many has a spiritual goal.  And the word hygiene comes from Hygieia, who, according to the Open University, was health personified, worshipped in the 4th century BC. Continue reading “Whatever happened to spiritual health?”

Will more female doctors be enough?

80 percent of lab rats, guinea pigs, or whatever test animals, are apparently male.  That is, according to a report done by Joséfa Lopez for Le Monde. (24 november, 2017)

When it comes to human test subjects, les than a quarter is a woman.

As a result, many medicines that have been tested on men are not suitable for women.  Not only do they have untested side effects, they may even be counterproductive, having the opposite effect of what is intended. Continue reading “Will more female doctors be enough?”

Does the BBC know what an Opioid is?

Fact checking seems to have been outsourced.  It used to be the domain of in-house sub-editors, but now it is almost entirely up to volunteers to spot accuracy in the media.  And, unfortunately, what passes for investigative journalism these days is little more than academic conjecture.

Take the BBC’s recent report claiming that the “real” opioid crisis is that poor countries don’t get enough.   The more you examine the facts, the more difficult that claim is to believe. Continue reading “Does the BBC know what an Opioid is?”

Immunotherapy, the new cancer buzzword

When a the University of Leeds asked those enrolled in “Exploring Cancer medicines” to write a short blog post on the future of Cancer medicines, over half of the participants chose immunotherapy.

In a healthy body, the immune system fights disease by attacking germs like viruses and bacteria.  However, as cancer uses the body’s own cells, and as many cancers are basically mutations of the body’s own cells, the immune system can’t always tell the difference between a normal cell and a cancer cell.

Immunotherapy is about help the body’s immune system recognise those cancer cells, so that the body will fight them in the way it fights other diseases.

Here are some of the titles chosen by the students:

  • The future of Lung Cancer
  • immunotherapy
  • Immunotherapy, maybe our own body can kick cancer’s butt
  • Immunotherapy as cancer treatment: the basics
  • It’s all down to you, Immunotherapy
  • Our own bodies can cure cancer
  • The future of cancer
  • Our bodies must fight back
  • The ongoing  battle
  • Immunology

 

Angel investor prescribes Dr Google.

Dr Aniruddha Malpani, who describes himself as an Angel investor with Malpani Investors, is gaining a lot of attention on LinkedIn by claiming that, “Lots of #doctors don’t like patients who visit #DrGoogle, but I find these #patients are usually smarter and more proactive.” Continue reading “Angel investor prescribes Dr Google.”