Will more female doctors be enough?

80 percent of lab rats, guinea pigs, or whatever test animals, are apparently male.  That is, according to a report done by Joséfa Lopez for Le Monde. (24 november, 2017)

When it comes to human test subjects, les than a quarter is a woman.

As a result, many medicines that have been tested on men are not suitable for women.  Not only do they have untested side effects, they may even be counterproductive, having the opposite effect of what is intended. Continue reading “Will more female doctors be enough?”

The financial implications of getting ill

In some countries, the subject of who should pay for healthcare has become a political topic. But even in the UK, where healthcare is paid for by the state, those who become ill suffer financially.

Th BBC reported on debts related to one illness, cancer.  That’s not a typo, the article is about debts, not deaths.  According to the charity MacMillan Cancer support, cancer patients often ask about debt rather than dying.  The debt is not incurred by paying for treatment, but through joblessness.

Screenwriter Joe Eszterhas once commented how difficult it was to find work when you have cancer.   Continue reading “The financial implications of getting ill”

See?

The eye has been called “the window to the soul” by people who have no idea how it works.

There were once a variety of theories on how we see:

Extramission: The theory that eyes emit a light, like the fire of the sun, onto objects they see, and then the image object is reflected back onto the water of eye.

Intromission: The theory that everything projects a smaller version of itself, with a smaller number of atoms, in all directions.  The eye catches this smaller image.

Intermission: The break in a long film, when your eyes get watery from looking at the screen in the dark for so long.

But now what causes vision more clearly, even if we don’t see objects in front of us as clearly as we used to. Continue reading “See?”

How healthy are you?

Here’s a quick test.

Time yourself doing 100 chin-ups.  Now, run three miles, preferably up a steep hill like Baintha Brakk.  After that, see how far you can swim against the current in half an hour (but don’t dive down straight from the hill, that would be dangerous.  Hopefully there’s a pool on top of the hill.)

Okay, when you’re breathing deeply from all that exercise, take your pulse. Continue reading “How healthy are you?”